Thanks to today’s digital lifestyles, contact lens wearers’ lives and eyes are constantly moving between on-screen and off-screen activities.

  • More than 90% of adults use digital devices more than two hours a day1 and nearly 60 percent of adults use digital devices for greater than five hours per day1.
  • Research conducted by Indiana University cited that among individuals using such devices, greater than 75% report eye tiredness and dryness at least once per week or more, and 35% once per day or more.2

Sustained focus on close-up digital devices strains the eye’s accommodative system. That’s where Digital Zone Optics™ lens design can help.

Digital Zone Optics is a breakthrough lens design for sphere lens wearers that use digital devices. Digital Zone Optics lens design helps ease accommodative burden as wearers move their gaze from on-screen to off-screen and back with less effort.

How it works

  • Multiple front-surface aspheric curves are employed across the entire optical zone.
  • These curves distribute power evenly to simulate more positive power in the center of the lens.

As a result, Digital Zone Optics lens design helps ease accommodative burden without impacting distance vision.

You’ll find Digital Zone Optics in Biofinity Energys™ contact lenses.

Patent-pending CooperVision® Biofinity Energys contact lense are designed for all-day wear, helping people’s eyes better adapt so they can seamlessly and continuously shift focus between digital devices and offline activities.

After one week of wear, 8 out of 10 digital device users agreed that Biofinity Energys lenses made their eyes feel less tired3

And Biofinity Energys lenses fit like a single-vision lens. They’re a new breakthrough for sphere lens wearers.

Ask your sphere patients about their digital device use. Biofinity Energys lenses with Digital Zone Optics are designed for their digital lifestyles.

1. The Vision Council. Hindsight is 20/20: Protecting Your Eyes from Digital Devices - 2015 Digital Eye Strain Report.
2. “Symptoms associated with eye fatigue in soft contact lens wearers.” Authors: D. Meyer, S. Huenink, M. Rickert, P. Chamberlain, and P. Kollbaum.  Presented at the American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting, October 2015, New Orleans, La., USA.
3. Among patients who use digital devices at least 4 hours per day at least 5 days per week and self-report symptoms of eye fatigue at least once per week. Data on file.

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